GM Announces The Future Is All Electric, Let’s Ride The Wave!

Way to be data driven and embrace technology GM! I didn’t know that GM sold more vehicles in China 3.6 million (many electric two seaters) compared to 3 million vehicles in the US.
They’re joining a growing list of manufacturers around the world going electric and also working on self driving cars. We can prepare and ride the technology wave or be battered by it by denial and not planning for the future.

Here’s a segment of an article on the announcement from GM from Wired published 10-2-17:

“AFTER MORE THAN a century peddling vehicles that pollute the atmosphere, General Motors is ending its relationship with gasoline and diesel. This morning, the American automotive giant announced that it is working toward an all-electric, zero-emissions future. That starts with two new, fully electric models next year—then at least 18 more by 2023.

That product onslaught puts the company at the forefront of an increasingly large crowd of automakers proclaiming the age of electricity and promising to move away from gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles. In recent months, Volvo, Aston Martin, and Jaguar Land Rover have announced similar moves. GM’s declaration, though, is particularly noteworthy because it’s among the very largest automakers on the planet. It sold 10 million cars last year, ranging from pickups to SUVs to urban runabouts.

“General Motors believes the future is all-electric,” says Mark Reuss, the company’s head of product. “We are far along in our plan to lead the way to that future world.”

Reuss did not give a date for the death knell of the GM gas- or diesel-powered car, saying the transition will happen at different speeds in different markets and regions. The new all-electric models will be a mix of battery electric cars and fuel cell-powered vehicles.

 To be sure, GM’s sudden jolt of electricity is planned with its shareholders in mind. The Trump Administration may be moving to roll back fuel efficiency requirements in the US, but the rest of the world is insisting on an electric age. France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and Norway have all said they plan to ban the sale of gas and diesel cars in the coming decades. More importantly, China—the world’s largest car market—and India, a rising star, plan to join them. No automaker can compete globally without a compelling stable of electric cars.”
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GM is just one of many manufacturers that are embracing technology, being data driven, and moving on to electric vehicles and autonomous driving features.
Here is another piece from a Mashable article sharing information on a broad range of manufacturers transitioning to electric vehicles.
“A recent spate of announcements from the biggest names in the auto industry has put electric vehicle development front and center. Some carmakers have even pledged to release only all-electric or electrified vehicles — which include hybrid engines that run on electric power at least some of the time — by certain target dates.

If these promises come to bear, the next decade will see a major shift in production trends, bringing electric vehicles to the streets in unprecedented numbers. That shift has already started, with a wave of all-electric cars built for mass appeal like the Chevy BoltNissan Leaf, and Tesla Model 3 now available. The next few years will see even more growth in the EV space.

Since most major automakers have at least outlined plans for electrification, we’ve compiled a list of  where they stand on EVs and when we can expect to see the new cars out on the road.

  • GM said it plans to phase out gas-powered vehicles for an “all-electric future” but didn’t give an exact date for an all-EV line. The effort starts, however, with plans for 20 all-electric vehicles by 2023.
  • Ford created the EV-dedicated “Team Edison” to focus on the development of all-electric cars. The automaker also pledged to invest $4.5 billion over five years on new all-electric and hybrid vehicles, with 13 new models slated for release by 2023.
  • Toyota and Mazda recently announced that they’re teaming up with auto-parts manufacturer Senso to create a new company to develop basic EV technology for use across multiple vehicle types and models, expanding beyond Toyota’s Prius line. The two Japanese carmakers also pledged to build a $1.6 billion U.S.-based plant by 2021, where they’ll work on electric and hybrid vehicles.
  • Daimler, the parent company of Mercedes-Benzwill invest $1 billion in an Alabama plant to produce all-electric SUVs and build a battery facility, and $10 billion in EV development overall. Mercedes-Benz outlined a plan to electrify its “entire portfolio” by 2022, offering 50 electric and hybrid models.
  • The Renault, Nissan, and Mitsubishi alliance will work together to develop new systems to use across their vehicle lines, with a focus on “purely electric” EVs like the Nissan Leaf. The automakers plan to release 12 all-electric models by 2022.
  • Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) plans to electrify its entire vehicle lineup by 2020, with new powertrains ranging from mild hybrid vehicles to all-electric systems.
  • Volvo will electrify its entire vehicle line by 2019, with five all-electric models slated to roll out from 2019 to 2021. The automaker hopes to sell one million of the electric and hybrid cars by 2025.
  • VW Group, parent of European automakers like Volkswagen, Audi, and Porschewill invest $84 billion in EV development. Roughly $60 billion of the total will be dedicated to battery production, but the company also plans to offer electric and hybrid versions of 300 vehicles by 2030.

2 Responses

  1. Andrew

    As someone who lives in a bedroom community to the FM area, I could get on board with an EV. The Bolt has allowed range anxiety to be somewhat a thing of the past, although I hope they can get something akin to a Tesla Supercharger for other makes. That way you could use it for a trip.

    For everyday life, it would be nice to see employers outlining areas where employees could park and charge (like preferred spots for EVs). I’m guessing that some employers already do that, but I think more could.

    At the end of the day, I’ll hold on to my 30mpg car and maybe when a Bolt comes off of lease in a few years I’ll look at picking it up.

  2. Acts 17:11

    Until an electric vehicle can operate with the same range as a gasoline-powered one, be quick and convenient to charge, and do it all for the same cost as a gasoline vehicle, I’m not interested.

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